Canterbury Tales: taking a break, early August 2017

One thing I’d like to be better at is taking time to remember the positive, tiny things that make a difference in every day life: the things that get me laughing in the morning or thinking ‘huzzah!’ when I get in from work. So, this week’s good things are…

I’m still signed off work, so this week has mostly been focused on resting up, trying to quietly get on with MA work for a bit of routine. It’s been good, and I’m feeling a bit better, but mental health is never a straight-line to recovery so…onwards we go:

Books, books, books

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I’ve slowed down on the reading front since last week, but it’s been fun to look at what’s unread on my shelves and take a bit longer each day to devour some literature. This week I finished The Summer Book by Tove Jansson, which is of course the exact opposite to the gloomy, moody weather of a UK August. Regardless of atmosphere – it’s a beautiful, beautiful novel filled with almost short-stories, and much like Amy Liptrot’s excellent memoir The Outrun it’s made me want to go exploring.

Les Miserables (and four years of awesome)

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Chris and I celebrated our four year anniversary this week – it’s come round quickly! A while back, he had an idea for what we could do and I suggested he book it and tell me on the day. At midnight on Thursday, I opened my card and found tickets to see Les Miserables that very evening – which I’ve wanted to see for years! So exciting 😀 It’s an excellent musical and definitely worth going to (even if the songs have been stuck in my head ever since)

Feeling the love

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More magical post arrived for me this week: flowers from work (<3) and a self-care box of things from one of my best friends. If this experience has taught me anything, it’s that a) I am so lucky to have people in my life who really care and b) sometimes it’s the smallest things that make the biggest difference.

Oxford

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I’m back home in Oxfordshire for a few days, so obviously couldn’t resist heading into Oxford to see a much-loved friend. Fun fact: even if you’re running for a bus, there are ridiculously perfect photo opportunities around every single corner. I love this city so much!

This week, I’m continuing to work on mental health stuff, hoping to get out on a bike ride if the weather holds up and enjoying being back in the countryside for a bit.

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Canterbury tales: taking a break, end of July 2017

One thing I’d like to be better at is taking time to remember the positive, tiny things that make a difference in every day life: the things that get me laughing in the morning or thinking ‘huzzah!’ when I get in from work. So, this week’s good things are…

There’s no way of sugar-coating this week’s blog post: this week has been really, really hard. Having somewhat seen the warning signs coming and not really acted on them, I’m taking a (temporary) break from work and have been signed off for a bit to get my mental health better. There’s a lot more to say on this matter, and it’s probably best off in a separate post, but for the moment: I am very, very lucky to have such good supportive employers and bosses who understood this decision. Stigma is real, but possibly what has been to my detriment has been my own refusal to acknowledge in practice that mental health should be treated like physical health. If I had been unable to recover from a bad cold that wouldn’t go away whilst at work, I would have had no hesitations in taking sick leave to get properly better. I didn’t do this here.

There are still good things. The joy this week is a little bit harder to find, but it is still here:

My friends

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There is no doubt about it: my friends rock beyond belief. Our Facebook group (set up last year to bridge distances as we all live in different places) yielded many many good ideas for how to self-care when I posted there earlier this week.

On Thursday, confusion reigned when I had a parcel arrive, considering the one item I’d bought had turned up the day before: cue teary happiness as I unwrapped a beautiful new Pusheen plush from two of my besties <3. Chris has, predictably, been amazing. I am very, very lucky.

Disney movie marathon

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Another ‘grateful for good people’ moment occurred over the weekend, when I spent the day with a friend determined to educate me in the ways of all the Disney movies I’ve somehow missed (most of them). A rainy day, tea, cake and Disney? YES. Anyway, I’m now up to speed on Inside Out, Moana and Big Hero 6. There will be more to come.

Reading

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In a ‘I don’t know if this is a good sign or a bad sign’ way, all I’ve been able to do recently is read (and sleep). As a result, I’ve finished one book this week and completed another two. Verdicts: Alone in Berlin is an excellent exploration of every day German life under the Nazi regime and the extent to which anyone could attempt ‘resistance’; Curtis Sittenfield’s Eligible has the worst UK cover for a book I’ve seen in years, but its modern-day retelling of Pride and Prejudice is quite fun if not entirely accurate/fair; Mara Wilson’s memoir is utterly brilliant, sharp and funny and I couldn’t put it down.

Lush’s face masks

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I’ve been a big fan of Lush’s face products for a while now; Ultrabland is easily the best cleanser I’ve ever tried and I’m completely hooked on Celestial for a daily moisturiser. Now, after returning five clean pots to them last weekend, I have a new favourite thing: their Catastrophe Cosmetic face mask. My skin is super sensitive, but this has done wonders in calming it down and balancing it out. SO GOOD.

Getting outside

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I’ve been trying to continue exercising this week as per normal, but I woke up today with a real urge to go for a walk. We’ve had annual passes to Leeds Castle (not in Leeds) for nearly a year now, and today’s trip confirmed that we’ll renew them next month: it is easily one of my favourite ever places. It’s a popular day out but the acres of walks, gardens and rolling hills around the castle mean you can go off the beaten track and chill on the lawns easily. And the views are spectacular!

This week, I’m resting up still, recovering from a wisdom tooth infection and looking forward to a) our four-year anniversary on Thursday and b) heading back to Oxfordshire  to see family next weekend!

How was your week? What’s been bringing you joy?

Canterbury tales: still-July 2017

One thing I’d like to be better at is taking time to remember the positive, tiny things that make a difference in every day life: the things that get me laughing in the morning or thinking ‘huzzah!’ when I get in from work. So, this week’s good things are…

Leeds for work, Leeds for catch-ups

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I was lucky enough to have my (first ever) paper accepted for the annual Association of Performing Arts Collections (APAC) symposium, this year held in Leeds. I went up the day before because trains are so expensive, but it gave me a bit to explore the city and – most importantly – catch up with a friend from uni who I haven’t seen properly in years. We went to the excellent Belgrave Music Hall & Canteen which won me over with a) its rooftop bar, b) its veggie burgers and c) the rather delicious strawberry and black pepper  gin cocktail, aka YUM. It was such a lovely way to spend an evening and see somewhere in Leeds totally different!

The next day, I gave my paper (which went well, I think) and we were treated to a tour of the Special Collections at the University of Leeds, nestled in their Brotherton Library which was “modelled on the British Library’s reading room, only bigger”. It’s such an impressive building, all polished wood and marble columns! The architecture in Leeds is such an interesting mix, with the glorious industrial-era redbrick campus contrasting against the very modern high rises of lights and shiny glass. I loved visiting the city for a couple of days; daft as it sounds, there is so much country beyond the Southern bubble I often inhabit and every time I leave that bubble I just want to see more.

New gym class

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Having missed my normal Monday spin and Tuesday abs classes, I finally got around to attending a kettlebells class on Wednesday. I’m so, so glad I did! I love my gym because it’s so small and personal which has really helped me feel at ease (I’m not the most sporty person ever, to put it mildly). When I got there, the instructors were all “you came!” and it was great to catch up with everyone. The class was hard, and I’ve been aching all week since, but it was SO satisfying. This week I’m gonna try and do all three Monday – Wednesday classes, so let’s see how that goes…

Discoveries: David Lloyd George’s copy of Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’

University of Kent Special Collections & Archives, SPEC COLL LLGC 2.2
University of Kent Special Collections & Archives, SPEC COLL LLGC 2.2

We’ve been collaborating a lot with the School of Music at work recently, and in amongst all the forthcoming pantomime activity there’s a bit of Dickens in the midst. A colleague recommended having a look at David Lloyd George’s copy of ‘A Christmas Carol’ for images and – wow! It’s a gorgeous 1930s edition, with an intact bookplate and some utterly gorgeous woodcut illustrations. Definitely one to remember.

Best friends in Canterbury

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This weekend we broke our guests-in-the-house record by having FIVE people stay over at one time! (Duvets were more of an issue than space, once it was agreed that it was totally fine to sleep in the conservatory). On Saturday, we ate so much homemade pizza (and snacks) (and Pimms) (and these chocolate brownies) whilst generally hanging out and playing Mario Kart, which we’ve rediscovered. (In accidentally stereotypical ways, the girls were very noisy  – “Oh NO! I’m going to DIE! No not the LAVA ARGH I’M 12TH!!!!!!!!!!!” – whilst the boys silently fought it out for 1st and 2nd place. Though I’ve still not forgiven Chris for bashing me a lot because his car was bigger than my bike…)

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Sunday saw us pretend that last night’s food fest hadn’t happened and the obligatory brunch in town was needed. By chance, The Refectory had space and so eight of us merged outside tables together and desperately prayed that the grey clouds overhead wouldn’t get any ideas. They didn’t, and WOW the food was incredible! Great coffee and one of the nicest lunches I’ve had in months – a spinach and chive crepe with baked egg, artichokes, goats cheese, mushrooms, caramelised onions and parmesan. I can’t believe it’s taken us a year to get round to trying this cafe, because I think it’s a new Canterbury favourite…

But the best bit of the weekend? Laughing my head off with friends I’ve known, in part, since we were 10. They are the best humans and it always feels like coming home when we meet up, even if the adulthood contrasts are getting a bit marked: we like sleep, and good coffee, and acknowledge that takeaway isn’t always the best thing ever. But they sure as heck are.

This week, I’m starting on my MA assignment, attempting three gym classes on three consecutive days, finishing up Master of None (STILL SO GOOD) and continuing reading Hans Fallada’s WW2 resistance novel Alone In Berlin.

How was your week? What’s been bringing you joy?

Canterbury tales: mid July 2017

One thing I’d like to be better at is taking time to remember the positive, tiny things that make a difference in every day life: the things that get me laughing in the morning or thinking ‘huzzah!’ when I get in from work. So, this week’s good things are…

Getting on top of health issues

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From ‘Moominland Midwinter’ by Tove Jansson. Sometimes I am the anxious Moomin, looking down rather than up at the sky

My week started on a bit of a wobbly note, when I rushed out the door to work on Monday morning and forgot to take any of my medication before leaving. I got diagnosed with asthma last year, and it’s slowly been getting worse after an inappropriately-timed June cold. 5 minutes into being outside, I started really feeling the effects of not taking my preventer. Chris has been urging me to reschedule the review I was supposed to have in February, so I managed to get an appointment the same day and lo! I now have a new, stronger inhaler along with a peak flow meter and more backup relievers.

I’ve also been in a bit of a mental health low point lately, and it started to get on top of me this week. The fun game I have to battle now is that I’ve only got one more counselling session left and I’m really scared of falling back to where I was. But I took some steps to try and make things better and things turned around pretty quickly. At least I know the symptoms – and triggers – now.

Hastings and Rye

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When your First-World-War-historian partner gets called to go on TV at the last minute, sometimes it’s fun to tag along. Which is how I found myself on Hastings Pier at 10am on a weekend. I hadn’t visited Hastings in many years, but it was worth it for the brief pier soujourn and coffee stop alone; plus, the early start meant we had lots of time to go on to other adventures in nearby Rye! Rye is such a gorgeous little town, with historic houses and churches around literally every corner along with so many cafes you could eat cream teas for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We’ve been taking a bit of time this year to explore around Kent/Sussex more, and I’d love to go back to Rye when it’s properly sunny and explore the harbour and countryside further.

Homemade pizza

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Still on my spend-very-little kick (the weekend’s coffee out was a real treat), one of the habits I’m finding hardest to kick is takeaway food. I was exhausted on Wednesday and really, really wanted pizza…but we compromised and made our own pizzas from scratch/the bread maker on Thursday. It turned out to be a great call; I used up veggies for toppings, but splurged on some goats’ cheese to give it a lift. Plus, we got four pizzas out of one portion of dough – so dinner for two nights! Definitely a win.

Continuing MA work

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Having finally finished the cataloguing module that lost the fight between me and the busy job, I’m onto social sciences research methods and determined to get it done a lot more quickly. I’ve been skimming the module this week and although I don’t think it’ll go down as the most interesting course in the MA, it’s getting me to think about research through different eyes which can only be a good thing.

This week I’m delivering my first ever conference paper at a symposium in Leeds, continuing watching Master of None obsessively (it’s SO GOOD) and eagerly anticipating/plotting the arrival of lots of friends next weekend!

How was your week? What’s been bringing you joy?

Canterbury tales: early July 2017

One thing I’d like to be better at is taking time to remember the positive, tiny things that make a difference in every day life: the things that get me laughing in the morning or thinking ‘huzzah!’ when I get in from work. So, this week’s good things are…

The sunshine

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Standard work lunchtime, with bonus of homemade salad

This year, we seem to be having the best weather in ages and it is just MARVELLOUS. I’m all for living in Birkenstocks, painting my toenails bright colours and spending lunchtimes reading under a tree. Yes please. This week we had an all-campus staff BBQ which was really lovely (and, hey, free food) and walking to/from work has been beautiful. Everything seems a bit brighter when it’s summer. Long may it last!

Getting Stuff Done

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I’ve had to have some pretty tough conversations about money and budgeting this week (it’s hard and it’s not my speciality). It wasn’t easy, but I’m positive about trying to set things right. In other adult-y things, my passport arrived (YAY) and I finally submitted a much-worked on MA assignment (DOUBLE YAY) and we got a funding bid in at work and statistics for projects have been conquered and I’ve been trying to use up more food which has resulted in yummy salads for lunch and sweet baked potatoes with dhal for dinner, so all the yay!

Wimbledon

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The beauty of Federer needs no comment

Confession: it doesn’t have to be Wimbledon, it could be the US Open or the French or the Australian or…but, well, we’re the UK, we get loads more coverage of the grass court season cause it’s all here and I tried not to get hooked until about 3pm on Day One when Murray looked healthy and Wawrinka went out and – you get the picture. I love the sound of tennis balls, I love the sport, the women’s (and men’s) draws are really open this year, I love IT ALL. 😀

Philip Yancey book arriving

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Pre No-Spending-Ever kicked in, I ordered a book I’ve been resisting buying for ages and it finally arrived this week. I never thought of myself as Christian (and I still don’t), but the New Atheism really repelled me so I’ve been trying to read a bit more about Christianity that’s written by Christians this year. A friend recommended I start with Philip Yancey’s book What’s So Amazing About Grace? and it’s changed my views about Christianity and God and religion an awful lot, by focusing on the good and examining (fairly) the challenges of being a Christian in today’s world. I’m really looking to reading The Jesus I Never Knew soon.

Brighton

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I went back to Brighton this weekend to see family and spend some time in the city and couldn’t have picked a better weekend. Whenever I return now, I have a love/hate relationship with the city: sometimes it’s busy and drives me up the wall with the millions of people and small spaces, sometimes I yearn to be back there when the skies are blue and there’s good coffee everywhere you look and the city feels so happy and buzzing. On Saturday, I felt the best of both: I ate my favourite food (and delighted in the arrival of veggie-friendly sweetshop SugarSin), caught up with the best friends (on the beach and over a glass of prosecco in the evening) and generally felt very lucky to be in the city. However, I don’t miss how busy it gets on weekends – I had some errands to run and they took ages, whereas if I lived there those extra minutes would just feel wasted – or the fact that it’s relatively big to get around, or the dirt, or every single street feeling like people are permanently trashed on weekends. Those mostly feel like privileged small-city-Canterbury grumbles, but I’m finally starting to appreciate the slightly slower pace of life in Kent which is good.

This week I’m continuing my Wimble-spree, getting stuck into my next MA module and spending work time talking all things Victorian pantomime as preparation for our major autumn exhibition continues apace! I’ve also got my first ever conference paper to write for next week…

What’s bringing you joy this week?

Canterbury tales: end of June 2017

Hello, blog! It’s been a while. Anyway, I’m back with another attempt to write more regularly about day-to-day existence in Kent-and-Library land. I am still in Canterbury (hello, permanent contract!) and still battling on with the MA. One day, one day…

One thing I’d like to be better at is taking time to remember the positive, tiny things that make a difference in every day life: the things that get me laughing in the morning or thinking ‘huzzah!’ when I get in from work. So, this week’s good things are…

Mega-bunny on campus

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Okay, this is technically a cheat from last week, but mega-bunny is still up, still (mostly) intact and still lurking over all the rest of the lifesized-bunnies outside the Library. I think he’s probably made by architecture students. I think he’s better than the sculpture he sits near. I love mega-bunny. 😀

Strawberry cake

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I’ve had an itch to bake this very-strawberry cake from Smitten Kitchen for weeks now, so on Wednesday I finally gave in and made cake just because. It’s been a while since I baked for the sheer joy of it, and after an afternoon of MA work it was exactly what I needed. In true OTT-style, I doubled the recipe, made far too much cake for anyone to ever eat (even with colleagues helping out) and now our kitchen is filled with strawberries. There are worse things to happen. The verdict? A bit too sweet for me, really, but still suspiciously good.

Completion of counselling

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One of the reasons I’ve been quiet on here is a pretty grim one: towards the end of last year my mental health took a serious, serious nosedive and I had to get some extra support, thanks to my excellent workplace, to get me out of it. I’ve been having counselling sessions since early this year and they have honestly been the best thing I’ve done in a long time. This week, we discussed forward steps knowing I only have one session left…and my counsellor and I decided that actually, I’m alright now! I’ve still got some work to do, of course, and I’m scared I might not be able to hold on this good state of mind, but I am so happy to be better than I’ve been in a long time. A good counsellor might not work for everyone, but it’s certainly done wonders for me. 🙂

Harry Potter, Harry Potter

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In small payday treats, I allowed myself to go into Primark today and see what cosy post-gym wear things I could find because lazy. Primark have turned a bit of a corner recently and their branded stuff is amazing! So, of course, I had to find Harry Potter themed PJs. I’m going to wear them all evening with pride 😀

This week, I’m continuing my attempt to get back into gym work after a bad cold, waiting for my new passport to arrive, declaring war on the weeds in our garden and continuing work on our departmental bid for Archives Accreditation in between delivering cartoon-based outreach sessions!

How was your week? What’s been bringing you joy?

Canterbury Tales: Week Two, March

Week two in Canterbury! Here’s how my week’s shaped up…

Goodbye Brighton

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Beautiful Kemptown

As proper farewells go, returning to Brighton to sort out the flat for one last time was pretty anticlimactic – I’ve always found it’s easier to just pretend it’s not really A Thing rather than saying goodbye. I came up from Canterbury for the day, but C was really ill so we tried (and failed) to get everything done in an afternoon.

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But oh, Brighton was sunny and lovely and busy and beautiful. It’ll always be home, and I can’t wait to go back in the summer. It’s such a part of who I am, I can’t imagine finally saying goodbye. So I’m not going to.

The New Commute

One thing I’ve been most looking forward to about moving to Canterbury is ditching my commute for something a little less stress inducing: much as I loved Kemptown in Brighton, it took 45 minutes – 1 hour by bus to get to work. (I could have walked, but it would have taken about an hour!) The buses often got crowded (particularly if you had to join at Old Steine) and getting home at the start of term was a relative nightmare.

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In Canterbury, however, it’s just a 25 minute walk to my new workplace – and the route is lovely! I can go cross country through Chaucer Fields, which are the ‘buffer’ between campus and the rest of town. It’s particularly lovely at the moment as spring is finally kicking in, and it’s really nice to get some exercise into the bargain.

The New Job

It’s always a memorable start to your new role when your first day falls on an all-library-staff meeting that takes place in a conference centre on the other side of campus…! It was quite funny, trying to contribute to activities where you’re so new that the words people are saying just about make sense.

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First week baking

It’s been a fantastic week though, and I’m very excited to get stuck into my role. One of the more challenging things I’ve found is getting used to the terminology Kent uses and how that works in relation to Sussex – even terms like ‘IT Services’ and ‘Intranet’ mean very different things here. After six years (and then three as a student) at Sussex, it’s refreshing and head-spinning to get used to how a different university does things – even if you’re fairly used to HE land, there are huge variations!

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Kent’s Conservative Association: blinding lefties with Thatcher statues

My new colleagues, luckily, are all just as lovely as I’d hoped and this is making everything a lot easier. Plus, one of the joys of working with special collections and archives is that it’s basically necessary to spend time getting to know all the cool stuff you now get to use… 😀

The New City

Now that I can get to and from work without getting lost and know where the Cathedral is in relation to most things, the important stuff can begin: exploring the best pubs, restaurants and places to hang out!

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New haircut selfie. Necessary for city exploring

On Wednesday I went out with said new colleagues. First stop? The Goods Shed, which is essentially the place where all my foodie-aspiration dreams go to get new ideas. The Goods Shed is part restaurant and bar, part local farmer’s market – and it’s just heaven. Their cocktails are some of the best I’ve ever tasted and the atmosphere is lovely. I think I’ll be back here a lot!

My other current favourite place is a really chilled out night venue called The Chocolate Cafe, which (predictably) serves many chocolate things until 11pm! It’s really nice to find somewhere that’s not a bar/club open so late, and it’s really nearby too. Again the vibe was  great – I need to go again soon 😀

What’s next: This weekend, C (and the fish) moves in! I can’t wait! Otherwise, I’ll be spending the time trying to shake off the horrible cold I’ve inevitably acquired…

 

 

Canterbury Tales: Week One, March

(This series of blog posts owes a huge debt to Jessica for suggesting the obviously cheesy title)

It’s finally happened – we’ve moved! Unbelievably, Canterbury has been my home for nearly a week now. I haven’t really processed leaving Brighton yet, and probably won’t for a while.

(I say ‘we’; in reality, C is still in Brighton for the next couple of weeks, living at his parents and finishing up some teaching…)

Moving Day

They say moving is one of the most stressful things you can do in life; no matter how many times I do it (and I’ve moved a lot, huzzah renting) it never seems to get any easier. Every time I’ve moved, there seems to be more to do: more companies to contact, more current-home-stuff to sort, inevitably more stuff to pack. This time, it felt extra stressful because a) it was a county move (no more hoping to drag leftovers around by bus/car/carrier pigeon) and b) I’d had a major work event and my leaving do on the preceding two nights.

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Naming your water bottles: important

 

On the day? We had wonderful help in the form of family and friends and four moving humans which made everything about a million times less stressful. There were some particularly memorable moments…

 

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such as when our sofa had to go out the window!

…but it all worked out okay. Better than okay, actually; great! Apart from our internet not being installed. But internet never works immediately, right? Especially if you’re with BT…

The New House

I’ve spent the past week padding around the new house on my own (why yes, I did stay up till 1am the day we moved in unpacking the entire kitchen and I regret nothing) and getting used to its new quirks. As your rent money goes further here, we’ve swapped the half-house for a full house which is such a luxury; we have a cellar, three bedrooms and a conservatory! Not to mention a garden! It’s very exciting and definitely not a sign of Being An Adult. Nope.

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Conservatory!

The New House shares some features with the Brighton Maisonette; like its predecessor, it’s surprisingly close to the city centre yet also very quiet. Both have living rooms on street level so you often get those funny scraps of conservation as people walk by. Both have churches in the vicinity; hearing bells on a Sunday is still a joy.

New House also has some unexpected features –  the quiet, yet frequent noise of the train station level crossing sirens (which I think might become permanently engrained in my head before long) being the biggest discovery. The fact that the house is actually light and warm, unlike Brighton Maisonette’s cold-and-a-bit-dark style, is another. The complex recycling system took me a while to figure out; I became concerned when my recycling hadn’t disappeared magically this morning and I called the council up in a fit of “oh gosh I’ve done it wrong” worry. (I hadn’t; they forgot. They actually fixed it, too, within an hour of my calling).

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My favourite thing about New House, however, is the stunning Cathedral view from my study window. We didn’t notice it when we viewed New House originally (too busy climbing narrow stairs and gasping at the dishwasher); now it’s one of my favourite views, not least because the Cathedral gets lit up at night. I can also see the tip of the Marlowe Theatre as well; such a stunning skyline! (N.B. I still don’t have any decent pictures of this view…)

Exploring Canterbury

As I’ve been off work / in between jobs, this week has been a good chance to explore my new home-city. I’d visited Canterbury a couple of times before moving here (this year to find a house and in previous years to visit family) and liked it a lot.

What I hadn’t remembered, however, is just how old Canterbury is and how far across the city the architecture spreads; the bus stop I needed to visit my cousin is near a pub established in 1570, the streets are lined with cobbles, and there are more parks within the city walls than I ever imagined. A good friend came to visit on Wednesday and showed me some parts of the city I’d not discovered yet; on Thursday, I meandered out on a longer sojourn. The sun crept out from behind the stone and it really felt like Spring had arrived; absolutely gorgeous.

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Canterbury is much smaller than Brighton, but I’m starting to think it’s a bit of a hidden gem compared to the seaside city. It’s got everything you need in a town; high street and independent shops, good restaurants, pubs, incredible architecture, parks. It’s still only an hour from London, but it’s so compact you can walk across the whole city in 20 minutes.

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But sssh on the last point; it’s our secret, okay? 🙂

What’s next: this weekend, I’m off back to Brighton to sort out (and say goodbye to) our old maisonette – before starting my new job on Monday! Fingers crossed the sun stays out – I can’t wait 😀

 

Ch-ch-changes: January 2016

I spent a lot of time last year reading about adventure, taking brave steps, leaping off into the unknown, following your heart. “Aw, wouldn’t a new adventure be fun,” I thought. “But…” …there’s always a ‘but’, I find. And in Brighton, this glorious city of sunshine and creativity and vibrancy, there’s always a reason to stay.

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Brighton, from Kemptown, 2015

The start of 2016 brought a quiet resolution to continue looking for work a bit more solidly than last year. I’ve been in my current role for six years and desperately need a new challenge. I love what I do, I love the people, I love the buzz of showing people the really cool material I get to work with. But it’s been my first job out of university; staying in one place forever is quite unlikely, much as I’d love to stay.

It’s the first week of February and I’ve just handed in my resignation from the first place I’ve ever worked full time. I’m moving to Canterbury for (at least) a year, having accepted a job offer at the wonderful Templeman Library, University of Kent! It’s my dream role, and exactly the one I needed to progress in my field of work.

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Canterbury Cathedral

I am ridiculously excited for this change – I never feel more alive when planning the future – but I’m also terrified. This is probably a sign that it’s the right point to go; change is healthy, it’s good for you. And I can’t wait to see what’s around the corner.

And, oh, I have so much to learn! I’ve got to plan a move for two people across counties, find somewhere to live, continue my MA, make new friends and keep seeing the people I love, discover somewhere new. I’m going to write more here and document the year too.

DSC_5151westpiersunset
It wouldn’t be a Brighton post without a West Pier photo…

One thing I do know: just as Oxford defined me a lot in Brighton, so Brighton will define me a lot in Canterbury. You wear your cities with you, carry them in your heart. And you can always return.

So, 2016, what’s next?